Seared Fish with Miso Butter

Seared Fish with Miso Butter

  • Prep time

    15 minutes

  • Cook time

    15 minutes

  • Course

    Main

  • Skill level

    Intermediate

  • Season

    Summer

  • Serves

    4
Chef’s notes

I was lucky enough to catch Mahi Mahi, aka dorado, with Kimi Werner on a recent trip to Hawaii. Mahi Mahi are nicknamed the rabbits of the ocean. They're an extremely fast growing fish and can spawn 2 to 3 times a year, making them a resilient and sustainable species to catch and eat.

Their flaky, mild white meat is delicious when simply seared in a cast iron skillet. I like to baste it with a miso compound butter for umami flavor, and finish it with a splash of citrus-ginger vinaigrette to brighten the plate. The vinaigrette is great on skewered veggies or salads, and the miso compound butter is excellent with other grilled meats.

Check out the first episode of Sourced, Season 2 here to watch Kimi and I catch dorado and cook up many more Hawaiian treasures.

Ingredients

  • 4 (6 to 8 oz.) skinless Mahi Mahi fillets
  • Shichimi Togarashi (substitute Mermaid’s Trident seasoning blend or your favorite seafood rub)
  • Coarse sea salt
  • High smoke point oil for cooking, such as avocado or grapeseed
  • Cooked jasmine or white rice for serving

Miso Compound Butter

  • ½ cup salted butter, softened to room temperature
  • 2 tbsp. white or yellow miso paste

Citrus-Ginger Vinaigrette

  • 3 tbsp. rice vinegar
  • 2 tbsp. fresh orange juice
  • 2 tbsp. white miso paste
  • 2 tsp. fresh ginger, grated
  • 1 clove garlic, grated
  • 1 tsp. sugar
  • ½ cup neutral-flavored oil, such as avocado or grapeseed
  • 1 tsp. toasted sesame oil

Also works with

Any flaky, white fish fillets about 1” thick

Preparation

  1. Start by making the vinaigrette. Combine all ingredients in a pint-sized mason jar and shake until emulsified. This can be made a few days ahead and stored in the refrigerator.
  2. When you’re ready to cook, remove the fish from the refrigerator at least 30 minutes and up to 1 hour before searing. As it comes to room temperature, stir the miso paste and butter together until well blended. You won’t need all of the butter for this recipe, but it can be stored in an airtight container in the refrigerator for a couple of weeks.
  3. Preheat a cast iron skillet over medium-high heat. Add enough oil to lightly coat the bottom of the pan in a thin layer. While the skillet pre-heats, pat the fish dry with a paper towel and season generously with shichimi togarashi on both sides. Lay each fillet down, leaving room in between each, and sear. As it cooks, you’ll notice the sides of the fish turning opaque and firm in texture. Cook until the bottom is golden brown and is about ¾ of the way finished cooking on the first side, then flip. The fish should lift freely from the pan without sticking. If it doesn’t, leave it there until a crust develops.
  4. After flipping, drop 2 tablespoons of the miso butter into the pan. Once the butter is foaming, tilt the pan to the side and use a spoon to baste the top of the fish until it’s cooked through.
  5. Remove the fish from the skillet and serve immediately with the rice and a spoonful of the citrus-ginger vinaigrette on top.
Chef’s notes

I was lucky enough to catch Mahi Mahi, aka dorado, with Kimi Werner on a recent trip to Hawaii. Mahi Mahi are nicknamed the rabbits of the ocean. They're an extremely fast growing fish and can spawn 2 to 3 times a year, making them a resilient and sustainable species to catch and eat.

Their flaky, mild white meat is delicious when simply seared in a cast iron skillet. I like to baste it with a miso compound butter for umami flavor, and finish it with a splash of citrus-ginger vinaigrette to brighten the plate. The vinaigrette is great on skewered veggies or salads, and the miso compound butter is excellent with other grilled meats.

Check out the first episode of Sourced, Season 2 here to watch Kimi and I catch dorado and cook up many more Hawaiian treasures.

Ingredients

  • 4 (6 to 8 oz.) skinless Mahi Mahi fillets
  • Shichimi Togarashi (substitute Mermaid’s Trident seasoning blend or your favorite seafood rub)
  • Coarse sea salt
  • High smoke point oil for cooking, such as avocado or grapeseed
  • Cooked jasmine or white rice for serving

Miso Compound Butter

  • ½ cup salted butter, softened to room temperature
  • 2 tbsp. white or yellow miso paste

Citrus-Ginger Vinaigrette

  • 3 tbsp. rice vinegar
  • 2 tbsp. fresh orange juice
  • 2 tbsp. white miso paste
  • 2 tsp. fresh ginger, grated
  • 1 clove garlic, grated
  • 1 tsp. sugar
  • ½ cup neutral-flavored oil, such as avocado or grapeseed
  • 1 tsp. toasted sesame oil

Also works with

Any flaky, white fish fillets about 1” thick

Preparation

  1. Start by making the vinaigrette. Combine all ingredients in a pint-sized mason jar and shake until emulsified. This can be made a few days ahead and stored in the refrigerator.
  2. When you’re ready to cook, remove the fish from the refrigerator at least 30 minutes and up to 1 hour before searing. As it comes to room temperature, stir the miso paste and butter together until well blended. You won’t need all of the butter for this recipe, but it can be stored in an airtight container in the refrigerator for a couple of weeks.
  3. Preheat a cast iron skillet over medium-high heat. Add enough oil to lightly coat the bottom of the pan in a thin layer. While the skillet pre-heats, pat the fish dry with a paper towel and season generously with shichimi togarashi on both sides. Lay each fillet down, leaving room in between each, and sear. As it cooks, you’ll notice the sides of the fish turning opaque and firm in texture. Cook until the bottom is golden brown and is about ¾ of the way finished cooking on the first side, then flip. The fish should lift freely from the pan without sticking. If it doesn’t, leave it there until a crust develops.
  4. After flipping, drop 2 tablespoons of the miso butter into the pan. Once the butter is foaming, tilt the pan to the side and use a spoon to baste the top of the fish until it’s cooked through.
  5. Remove the fish from the skillet and serve immediately with the rice and a spoonful of the citrus-ginger vinaigrette on top.

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Seared Fish with Miso Butter

Recipe by: Danielle Prewett
Seared Fish with Miso Butter
  • Prep time

    15 minutes

  • Cook time

    15 minutes

  • Course

    Main

  • Skill level

    Intermediate

  • Season

    Summer

  • Serves

    4
Chef’s notes

I was lucky enough to catch Mahi Mahi, aka dorado, with Kimi Werner on a recent trip to Hawaii. Mahi Mahi are nicknamed the rabbits of the ocean. They're an extremely fast growing fish and can spawn 2 to 3 times a year, making them a resilient and sustainable species to catch and eat.

Their flaky, mild white meat is delicious when simply seared in a cast iron skillet. I like to baste it with a miso compound butter for umami flavor, and finish it with a splash of citrus-ginger vinaigrette to brighten the plate. The vinaigrette is great on skewered veggies or salads, and the miso compound butter is excellent with other grilled meats.

Check out the first episode of Sourced, Season 2 here to watch Kimi and I catch dorado and cook up many more Hawaiian treasures.

Ingredients

  • 4 (6 to 8 oz.) skinless Mahi Mahi fillets
  • Shichimi Togarashi (substitute Mermaid’s Trident seasoning blend or your favorite seafood rub)
  • Coarse sea salt
  • High smoke point oil for cooking, such as avocado or grapeseed
  • Cooked jasmine or white rice for serving

Miso Compound Butter

  • ½ cup salted butter, softened to room temperature
  • 2 tbsp. white or yellow miso paste

Citrus-Ginger Vinaigrette

  • 3 tbsp. rice vinegar
  • 2 tbsp. fresh orange juice
  • 2 tbsp. white miso paste
  • 2 tsp. fresh ginger, grated
  • 1 clove garlic, grated
  • 1 tsp. sugar
  • ½ cup neutral-flavored oil, such as avocado or grapeseed
  • 1 tsp. toasted sesame oil

Also works with

Any flaky, white fish fillets about 1” thick

Preparation

  1. Start by making the vinaigrette. Combine all ingredients in a pint-sized mason jar and shake until emulsified. This can be made a few days ahead and stored in the refrigerator.
  2. When you’re ready to cook, remove the fish from the refrigerator at least 30 minutes and up to 1 hour before searing. As it comes to room temperature, stir the miso paste and butter together until well blended. You won’t need all of the butter for this recipe, but it can be stored in an airtight container in the refrigerator for a couple of weeks.
  3. Preheat a cast iron skillet over medium-high heat. Add enough oil to lightly coat the bottom of the pan in a thin layer. While the skillet pre-heats, pat the fish dry with a paper towel and season generously with shichimi togarashi on both sides. Lay each fillet down, leaving room in between each, and sear. As it cooks, you’ll notice the sides of the fish turning opaque and firm in texture. Cook until the bottom is golden brown and is about ¾ of the way finished cooking on the first side, then flip. The fish should lift freely from the pan without sticking. If it doesn’t, leave it there until a crust develops.
  4. After flipping, drop 2 tablespoons of the miso butter into the pan. Once the butter is foaming, tilt the pan to the side and use a spoon to baste the top of the fish until it’s cooked through.
  5. Remove the fish from the skillet and serve immediately with the rice and a spoonful of the citrus-ginger vinaigrette on top.