Mushroom-Rubbed Carpaccio

Mushroom-Rubbed Carpaccio

  • Prep time

    30 minutes

  • Cook time

    -

  • Course

    Small Bites

  • Skill level

    Intermediate

  • Season

    All Seasons

  • Serves

    3 to 4
Chef’s notes

Thinly sliced raw meat. That phrase doesn’t have that three Michelin star vibe to it, but that’s what carpaccio is. Thanks to fancy restaurants and modern refrigeration, consuming raw meats and fish is more popular than ever. While the popularity of carpaccio, tartare, and sushi is a remarkable shift from the “well done everything” mindset of just a few generations ago, there is still a misconception that raw foods must be acquired at places that serve fancy food.

Having worked in restaurants for over two decades, I’ve noticed a sense of mysticism that surrounds the food served. People will readily consume raw fish, oysters, and meat when it’s served over white linens but are hesitant of the idea that they could make it at home.

Making carpaccio involves no magic or special training, just a general understanding of food safety and the confidence to make it happen. If you're really intimidated by the process, check out our guide to making carpaccio for beginners.

Ingredients

  • 6 oz. venison backstrap, center cut
  • 1 tbsp. dried porcini mushrooms, ground
  • Zest of ½ lemon, pith removed, sliced thin
  • ½ shallot, sliced thin
  • 1 tsp. salt cured capers
  • Extra virgin olive oil
  • Fresh black pepper
  • Aged parmesan cheese

Also works with

Beef

Special equipment

Mallet

Preparation

  1. Preheat a heavy bottomed pan to high heat.
  2. Trim the backstrap of silver skin. Season with salt and pepper and dust with porcini powder.
  3. Lightly oil the hot pan and sear the backstrap, use tongs to rotate to get an even sear, about 30 seconds on each side.
  4. Place seared backstrap on a plate and place in the freezer for 20 minutes.
  5. Slice backstrap, across the grain ⅛” thick. Place slices on a piece of plastic wrap on a cutting board, leaving 1” between slices. Cover with another layer of plastic wrap. Using the textured side of a meat mallet, lightly pound the slices starting in the center and working towards the edges. Flip the meat over and repeat. Now use the flat side and repeat the hammering on both sides. The meat should be almost see-through thin.
  6. Peel back the top layer of plastic wrap. Place a large plate face side down over the meat and slip your hand under the cutting board. Flip it right side up to neatly deposit the slices onto the plate without tearing or bunching them. Peel back the plastic wrap and top the meat with salt, pepper, olive oil, capers, lemon zest, shallot and a touch of parmesan. Open a good bottle of wine, and serve immediately.
Chef’s notes

Thinly sliced raw meat. That phrase doesn’t have that three Michelin star vibe to it, but that’s what carpaccio is. Thanks to fancy restaurants and modern refrigeration, consuming raw meats and fish is more popular than ever. While the popularity of carpaccio, tartare, and sushi is a remarkable shift from the “well done everything” mindset of just a few generations ago, there is still a misconception that raw foods must be acquired at places that serve fancy food.

Having worked in restaurants for over two decades, I’ve noticed a sense of mysticism that surrounds the food served. People will readily consume raw fish, oysters, and meat when it’s served over white linens but are hesitant of the idea that they could make it at home.

Making carpaccio involves no magic or special training, just a general understanding of food safety and the confidence to make it happen. If you're really intimidated by the process, check out our guide to making carpaccio for beginners.

Ingredients

  • 6 oz. venison backstrap, center cut
  • 1 tbsp. dried porcini mushrooms, ground
  • Zest of ½ lemon, pith removed, sliced thin
  • ½ shallot, sliced thin
  • 1 tsp. salt cured capers
  • Extra virgin olive oil
  • Fresh black pepper
  • Aged parmesan cheese

Also works with

Beef

Special equipment

Mallet

Preparation

  1. Preheat a heavy bottomed pan to high heat.
  2. Trim the backstrap of silver skin. Season with salt and pepper and dust with porcini powder.
  3. Lightly oil the hot pan and sear the backstrap, use tongs to rotate to get an even sear, about 30 seconds on each side.
  4. Place seared backstrap on a plate and place in the freezer for 20 minutes.
  5. Slice backstrap, across the grain ⅛” thick. Place slices on a piece of plastic wrap on a cutting board, leaving 1” between slices. Cover with another layer of plastic wrap. Using the textured side of a meat mallet, lightly pound the slices starting in the center and working towards the edges. Flip the meat over and repeat. Now use the flat side and repeat the hammering on both sides. The meat should be almost see-through thin.
  6. Peel back the top layer of plastic wrap. Place a large plate face side down over the meat and slip your hand under the cutting board. Flip it right side up to neatly deposit the slices onto the plate without tearing or bunching them. Peel back the plastic wrap and top the meat with salt, pepper, olive oil, capers, lemon zest, shallot and a touch of parmesan. Open a good bottle of wine, and serve immediately.
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Mushroom-Rubbed Carpaccio

Recipe by: Wade Truong
Mushroom-Rubbed Carpaccio
  • Prep time

    30 minutes

  • Cook time

    -

  • Course

    Small Bites

  • Skill level

    Intermediate

  • Season

    All Seasons

  • Serves

    3 to 4
Chef’s notes

Thinly sliced raw meat. That phrase doesn’t have that three Michelin star vibe to it, but that’s what carpaccio is. Thanks to fancy restaurants and modern refrigeration, consuming raw meats and fish is more popular than ever. While the popularity of carpaccio, tartare, and sushi is a remarkable shift from the “well done everything” mindset of just a few generations ago, there is still a misconception that raw foods must be acquired at places that serve fancy food.

Having worked in restaurants for over two decades, I’ve noticed a sense of mysticism that surrounds the food served. People will readily consume raw fish, oysters, and meat when it’s served over white linens but are hesitant of the idea that they could make it at home.

Making carpaccio involves no magic or special training, just a general understanding of food safety and the confidence to make it happen. If you're really intimidated by the process, check out our guide to making carpaccio for beginners.

Ingredients

  • 6 oz. venison backstrap, center cut
  • 1 tbsp. dried porcini mushrooms, ground
  • Zest of ½ lemon, pith removed, sliced thin
  • ½ shallot, sliced thin
  • 1 tsp. salt cured capers
  • Extra virgin olive oil
  • Fresh black pepper
  • Aged parmesan cheese

Also works with

Beef

Special equipment

Mallet

Preparation

  1. Preheat a heavy bottomed pan to high heat.
  2. Trim the backstrap of silver skin. Season with salt and pepper and dust with porcini powder.
  3. Lightly oil the hot pan and sear the backstrap, use tongs to rotate to get an even sear, about 30 seconds on each side.
  4. Place seared backstrap on a plate and place in the freezer for 20 minutes.
  5. Slice backstrap, across the grain ⅛” thick. Place slices on a piece of plastic wrap on a cutting board, leaving 1” between slices. Cover with another layer of plastic wrap. Using the textured side of a meat mallet, lightly pound the slices starting in the center and working towards the edges. Flip the meat over and repeat. Now use the flat side and repeat the hammering on both sides. The meat should be almost see-through thin.
  6. Peel back the top layer of plastic wrap. Place a large plate face side down over the meat and slip your hand under the cutting board. Flip it right side up to neatly deposit the slices onto the plate without tearing or bunching them. Peel back the plastic wrap and top the meat with salt, pepper, olive oil, capers, lemon zest, shallot and a touch of parmesan. Open a good bottle of wine, and serve immediately.