Grilled Goose with Figs

Grilled Goose with Figs

  • Prep time

    15 minutes

  • Cook time

    15 minutes

  • Course

    Main

  • Skill level

    Intermediate

  • Season

    Fall, Summer

  • Serves

    3 to 4
Chef’s notes

Early-season goose hunting feels entirely different from the late-season goose hunting I'm more accustomed to. There is freshly chopped corn on the field instead of snow, and instead of trying to keep my hands warm, I'm worried about ticks. But the sound of geese overhead has my blood pumping just the same.

One major benefit of having fresh goose meat in early September is that the produce season is still going strong here in Virginia. In particular, figs are usually going gangbusters around the time we start dusting off shotguns.

A fresh ripe fig is an ephemeral flavor worth taking advantage of every chance you get. A properly ripe fig only lasts a few days, so eat them while you can. Combined with feta, mint, goose, and balsamic, you have a tangy, rich, and savory summer meal that takes less than 30 minutes to put together.

I like to make a balsamic syrup with some dried figs (you can use fresh if you’d like) to pair with grilled goose breast. It’s an extremely simple way to add a tangy and savory layer to any late summer meal, and it pairs beautifully with the slightly smokey notes of grilled goose.

I recommend scoring the skin on the goose breasts before cooking. This increases the amount of fat rendered while cooking and also helps you get super crispy skin. The rendering fat will cause small flare-ups on the grill, which give grilled foods their distinct charred flavor. This works particularly well with early-season birds because they usually haven’t been gorging on soy and corn like their late-season relatives. With less fat under it, the skin will crisp up faster than a cold-weather bird.

how to grill goose

Ingredients

Fig-Balsamic Syrup

  • ½ cup balsamic vinegar
  • 2 tbsp. sugar
  • ¼ cup dried figs, diced

For the Goose

  • Goose breasts
  • Fresh figs
  • Feta cheese
  • Mint leaves

Also works with

Any gamebird breast

Special equipment

Grill

Preparation

  1. To make the syrup, combine all ingredients in a small saucepan, heat over medium heat, and stir to dissolve sugar. Reduce heat to medium-low and simmer for about 15 minutes, or until syrup is thick enough to coat a spoon. Strain solids from syrup before use.
  2. Preheat the grill to 375°F.
  3. Season goose breast with salt and pepper. Cook skin side up, covered, for 5 to 7 minutes, flip and cook for another 3 to 5 minutes, or until internal temperature reaches about 125°F.
  4. Remove from the grill and allow to rest for 5 to 10 minutes before slicing.
  5. Slice the goose breast thinly, across the grain. Serve with the figs, feta, and mint. Finish with a generous drizzle of the fig-balsamic syrup.
Chef’s notes

Early-season goose hunting feels entirely different from the late-season goose hunting I'm more accustomed to. There is freshly chopped corn on the field instead of snow, and instead of trying to keep my hands warm, I'm worried about ticks. But the sound of geese overhead has my blood pumping just the same.

One major benefit of having fresh goose meat in early September is that the produce season is still going strong here in Virginia. In particular, figs are usually going gangbusters around the time we start dusting off shotguns.

A fresh ripe fig is an ephemeral flavor worth taking advantage of every chance you get. A properly ripe fig only lasts a few days, so eat them while you can. Combined with feta, mint, goose, and balsamic, you have a tangy, rich, and savory summer meal that takes less than 30 minutes to put together.

I like to make a balsamic syrup with some dried figs (you can use fresh if you’d like) to pair with grilled goose breast. It’s an extremely simple way to add a tangy and savory layer to any late summer meal, and it pairs beautifully with the slightly smokey notes of grilled goose.

I recommend scoring the skin on the goose breasts before cooking. This increases the amount of fat rendered while cooking and also helps you get super crispy skin. The rendering fat will cause small flare-ups on the grill, which give grilled foods their distinct charred flavor. This works particularly well with early-season birds because they usually haven’t been gorging on soy and corn like their late-season relatives. With less fat under it, the skin will crisp up faster than a cold-weather bird.

how to grill goose

Ingredients

Fig-Balsamic Syrup

  • ½ cup balsamic vinegar
  • 2 tbsp. sugar
  • ¼ cup dried figs, diced

For the Goose

  • Goose breasts
  • Fresh figs
  • Feta cheese
  • Mint leaves

Also works with

Any gamebird breast

Special equipment

Grill

Preparation

  1. To make the syrup, combine all ingredients in a small saucepan, heat over medium heat, and stir to dissolve sugar. Reduce heat to medium-low and simmer for about 15 minutes, or until syrup is thick enough to coat a spoon. Strain solids from syrup before use.
  2. Preheat the grill to 375°F.
  3. Season goose breast with salt and pepper. Cook skin side up, covered, for 5 to 7 minutes, flip and cook for another 3 to 5 minutes, or until internal temperature reaches about 125°F.
  4. Remove from the grill and allow to rest for 5 to 10 minutes before slicing.
  5. Slice the goose breast thinly, across the grain. Serve with the figs, feta, and mint. Finish with a generous drizzle of the fig-balsamic syrup.

Shop

4 Pack Seasonings Gift Pack
Save this product
Spiceology
$35.99
Get the what you need to cover nearly any recipe in the kitchen. Designed tocover Fin, Fowl, Forage, and Fur these spices will step up your game in thekitchen with nearly any critter you bring home.
Braiser 3.5 QT
Save this product
Staub
$329.99
A featured piece in the kitchen of Chef Kevin Gillespie, the Braiser has broad functionality from freezer to oven to table.
Tall Cocotte 5 QT
Save this product
Staub
$199.99
"I use my Staub dutch oven more than any other cookware during the winter for creating delicious braised wild game recipes." - Danielle Prewett
The MeatEater Fish and Game Cookbook
Save this product
Penguin Random House
$35.00
The definitive guide to cooking wild game, including fish and fowl, featuring more than 100 new recipes.
Subscribe to Wild + Whole
Be the first to learn about Wild + Whole recipes, cooking techniques, and tips for growing or raising food to make you more confident in the kitchen, garden, and the outdoors
Save this recipe

Grilled Goose with Figs

Recipe by: Wade Truong
Grilled Goose with Figs
  • Prep time

    15 minutes

  • Cook time

    15 minutes

  • Course

    Main

  • Skill level

    Intermediate

  • Season

    Fall, Summer

  • Serves

    3 to 4
Chef’s notes

Early-season goose hunting feels entirely different from the late-season goose hunting I'm more accustomed to. There is freshly chopped corn on the field instead of snow, and instead of trying to keep my hands warm, I'm worried about ticks. But the sound of geese overhead has my blood pumping just the same.

One major benefit of having fresh goose meat in early September is that the produce season is still going strong here in Virginia. In particular, figs are usually going gangbusters around the time we start dusting off shotguns.

A fresh ripe fig is an ephemeral flavor worth taking advantage of every chance you get. A properly ripe fig only lasts a few days, so eat them while you can. Combined with feta, mint, goose, and balsamic, you have a tangy, rich, and savory summer meal that takes less than 30 minutes to put together.

I like to make a balsamic syrup with some dried figs (you can use fresh if you’d like) to pair with grilled goose breast. It’s an extremely simple way to add a tangy and savory layer to any late summer meal, and it pairs beautifully with the slightly smokey notes of grilled goose.

I recommend scoring the skin on the goose breasts before cooking. This increases the amount of fat rendered while cooking and also helps you get super crispy skin. The rendering fat will cause small flare-ups on the grill, which give grilled foods their distinct charred flavor. This works particularly well with early-season birds because they usually haven’t been gorging on soy and corn like their late-season relatives. With less fat under it, the skin will crisp up faster than a cold-weather bird.

how to grill goose

Ingredients

Fig-Balsamic Syrup

  • ½ cup balsamic vinegar
  • 2 tbsp. sugar
  • ¼ cup dried figs, diced

For the Goose

  • Goose breasts
  • Fresh figs
  • Feta cheese
  • Mint leaves

Also works with

Any gamebird breast

Special equipment

Grill

Preparation

  1. To make the syrup, combine all ingredients in a small saucepan, heat over medium heat, and stir to dissolve sugar. Reduce heat to medium-low and simmer for about 15 minutes, or until syrup is thick enough to coat a spoon. Strain solids from syrup before use.
  2. Preheat the grill to 375°F.
  3. Season goose breast with salt and pepper. Cook skin side up, covered, for 5 to 7 minutes, flip and cook for another 3 to 5 minutes, or until internal temperature reaches about 125°F.
  4. Remove from the grill and allow to rest for 5 to 10 minutes before slicing.
  5. Slice the goose breast thinly, across the grain. Serve with the figs, feta, and mint. Finish with a generous drizzle of the fig-balsamic syrup.