Mushroom Crusted Venison Loin Recipe

This holiday season, I’ve paired what I consider to be the best tasting wild game with a savory porcini mushroom rub and sauce. This Wyoming antelope is my first big game kill, and I look forward to sharing this special meal with others. Although this specific dish calls for speed goat, you could use it with any hoofed wild game.

Porcini is known for being rich and earthy, a flavor that happens to pair very well with all types of venison. It’s challenging to find these mushrooms fresh, but luckily you can purchase them dried in many grocery stores and online.

There are several advantages to using dried mushrooms. They have a long shelf life and generally have a more concentrated flavor. In this particular recipe, I grind the mushrooms into a powder for the rub and reconstitute it in stock to make the base for an amazing pan sauce.

Porcini, dried mushroom, antelope, backstap, steak

Serving size

4-6

Time to make

1 hour

Ingredients

1 antelope loin, cut into filets or steaks
1/2 oz. dried porcini mushrooms (substitute with shiitake or chanterelle)
2 cups chicken stock
3 tbsp. butter, divided
2 fresh rosemary sprigs
2 cloves of garlic, minced
1 1/2 tbsp. red wine vinegar
Cooking oil

1/4 oz. dried porcini mushrooms
1/2 sprig of fresh rosemary leaves (1 tbsp. leaves)
2 tbsp. kosher salt
1 tbsp. black pepper

Also works with

Any venison, including deer and elk

How to make it

1
  1. Pulse the dried porcinis and rosemary in a small spice grinder until it reaches a fine granular consistency.
  2. Mix the mushroom powder with the salt and pepper in a small bowl until combined. This makes about 1/2 cup worth of rub, but you will not use all of it. Reserve what you don’t use in a jar or plastic bag. It will keep for several weeks or months in the pantry.
2
  1. Preheat an oven to 350 degrees.
  2. Cut the antelope loin into filets or the steak size you desire. Tying twine around the filets will help keep its shape and makes for a nice presentation. Season each steak generously with the porcini rub.
  3. Place the chicken stock and dried mushrooms into a small pot over medium heat. Bring to a soft boil and reduce the heat. Let the stock simmer until it has reduced down to ¾ to 1 cup of liquid. By the time it has reduced, the mushrooms should be reconstituted. If they are not soft, place the lid on the pot, remove from heat, and let them steep until they are soft.
  4. Strain the mushrooms from the liquid and reserve the stock. Pat the mushrooms as dry as you can and chop finely. Set aside until ready to cook.
  5. Heat an oven proof sauté or cast iron pan over medium-high heat. Once hot, add a tablespoon of cooking oil and quickly sear the meat on all sides to brown. Transfer the entire pan into the oven to finish cooking. Remove when the steaks are cooked to your desired doneness: 125 degrees for rare, 130 degrees for medium-rare, or 135 for medium. Let the steaks rest while you make the pan sauce.
  6. Place the sauté pan back on the burner over low heat. Add 1 tablespoon of butter; it should foam almost immediately since the pan is already very hot. Add the mushrooms and rosemary sprigs and quickly sauté. Sprinkle in the minced garlic and cook another minute, stirring frequently. Reduce the heat if needed, don’t let anything burn.
  7. Deglaze with the red wine vinegar and the stock, scraping up the cracklings at the bottom of the pan. Bring the liquids to a soft boil and let it reduce. Add the last two tablespoons of butter and swirl to combine. Taste and season with salt, pepper, or a pinch of the porcini rub.
  8. Serve the pan sauce immediately with the antelope filets.

Serving size

4-6

Time to make

1 hour

Ingredients

1 antelope loin, cut into filets or steaks
1/2 oz. dried porcini mushrooms (substitute with shiitake or chanterelle)
2 cups chicken stock
3 tbsp. butter, divided
2 fresh rosemary sprigs
2 cloves of garlic, minced
1 1/2 tbsp. red wine vinegar
Cooking oil

1/4 oz. dried porcini mushrooms
1/2 sprig of fresh rosemary leaves (1 tbsp. leaves)
2 tbsp. kosher salt
1 tbsp. black pepper

Also works with

Any venison, including deer and elk

Special equipment

Spice grinder, large sauté pan or cast iron skillet, small sauce pot