Danielle’s Favorite Quick Pickle Brine

Danielle’s Favorite Quick Pickle Brine

  • Prep time

    30 minutes

  • Cook time

    -

  • Course

    Condiments

  • Skill level

    Beginner

  • Season

    Summer

  • Serves

    3 pints
Chef’s notes

Refrigerator pickles are one of the easiest things to make and are a great way to extend the shelf life of produce from your garden or farmer’s market. This is my favorite all-purpose quick pickle brine that you can use for virtually anything: diced radishes, sliced swiss chard stems, or green tomatoes.

Pickled vegetables are great to add in salads, as a condiment to rich meat, or to brighten otherwise dull meals. And, don’t forget to use up those pickling liquids too! I like to add a splash to a pot of greens when cooking and use it as a base for a vinaigrette.

Remember that these are refrigerator pickles and are not meant for canning! They must be stored in the refrigerator and will keep for several weeks to two months.

Ingredients

  • 3 pint-sized jars
  • 2 lb. fresh vegetables *
  • Aromatics **
  • 1 ½ cup white wine vinegar
  • 3 cup water
  • ⅓ cup sugar
  • 2 tbsp. kosher sea salt

* Favorites include cucumbers, radishes, green beans, jalapenos, green tomatoes, okra, carrots, and summer squash. ** Aromatics include garlic, onion, shallot, ginger, herbs, and whole spices.

Preparation

  1. Choose which vegetables and aromatics (see note below) you want to pickle. Chop, thinly slice, or quarter them into even sized pieces. Most vegetables can be pickled raw, but if you’re using wax beans, asparagus, or broccoli, it’s best to blanch first. Once you’ve made your customized blend, stuff them into clean jars.
  2. Bring the vinegar, water, sugar, and salt to a simmer on the stove. Stir until the sugar and salt have dissolved. Pour the hot brine over the vegetables, ensuring that the liquids completely cover. Save any extra brine not used for vinaigrettes. Once the jar cools you can screw the cap on and store in the refrigerator for several weeks to two months.
Chef’s notes

Refrigerator pickles are one of the easiest things to make and are a great way to extend the shelf life of produce from your garden or farmer’s market. This is my favorite all-purpose quick pickle brine that you can use for virtually anything: diced radishes, sliced swiss chard stems, or green tomatoes.

Pickled vegetables are great to add in salads, as a condiment to rich meat, or to brighten otherwise dull meals. And, don’t forget to use up those pickling liquids too! I like to add a splash to a pot of greens when cooking and use it as a base for a vinaigrette.

Remember that these are refrigerator pickles and are not meant for canning! They must be stored in the refrigerator and will keep for several weeks to two months.

Ingredients

  • 3 pint-sized jars
  • 2 lb. fresh vegetables *
  • Aromatics **
  • 1 ½ cup white wine vinegar
  • 3 cup water
  • ⅓ cup sugar
  • 2 tbsp. kosher sea salt

* Favorites include cucumbers, radishes, green beans, jalapenos, green tomatoes, okra, carrots, and summer squash. ** Aromatics include garlic, onion, shallot, ginger, herbs, and whole spices.

Preparation

  1. Choose which vegetables and aromatics (see note below) you want to pickle. Chop, thinly slice, or quarter them into even sized pieces. Most vegetables can be pickled raw, but if you’re using wax beans, asparagus, or broccoli, it’s best to blanch first. Once you’ve made your customized blend, stuff them into clean jars.
  2. Bring the vinegar, water, sugar, and salt to a simmer on the stove. Stir until the sugar and salt have dissolved. Pour the hot brine over the vegetables, ensuring that the liquids completely cover. Save any extra brine not used for vinaigrettes. Once the jar cools you can screw the cap on and store in the refrigerator for several weeks to two months.
Subscribe to Wild + Whole
Be the first to learn about Wild + Whole recipes, cooking techniques, and tips for growing or raising food to make you more confident in the kitchen, garden, and the outdoors

Danielle’s Favorite Quick Pickle Brine

Recipe by: Danielle Prewett
Danielle’s Favorite Quick Pickle Brine
  • Prep time

    30 minutes

  • Cook time

    -

  • Course

    Condiments

  • Skill level

    Beginner

  • Season

    Summer

  • Serves

    3 pints
Chef’s notes

Refrigerator pickles are one of the easiest things to make and are a great way to extend the shelf life of produce from your garden or farmer’s market. This is my favorite all-purpose quick pickle brine that you can use for virtually anything: diced radishes, sliced swiss chard stems, or green tomatoes.

Pickled vegetables are great to add in salads, as a condiment to rich meat, or to brighten otherwise dull meals. And, don’t forget to use up those pickling liquids too! I like to add a splash to a pot of greens when cooking and use it as a base for a vinaigrette.

Remember that these are refrigerator pickles and are not meant for canning! They must be stored in the refrigerator and will keep for several weeks to two months.

Ingredients

  • 3 pint-sized jars
  • 2 lb. fresh vegetables *
  • Aromatics **
  • 1 ½ cup white wine vinegar
  • 3 cup water
  • ⅓ cup sugar
  • 2 tbsp. kosher sea salt

* Favorites include cucumbers, radishes, green beans, jalapenos, green tomatoes, okra, carrots, and summer squash. ** Aromatics include garlic, onion, shallot, ginger, herbs, and whole spices.

Preparation

  1. Choose which vegetables and aromatics (see note below) you want to pickle. Chop, thinly slice, or quarter them into even sized pieces. Most vegetables can be pickled raw, but if you’re using wax beans, asparagus, or broccoli, it’s best to blanch first. Once you’ve made your customized blend, stuff them into clean jars.
  2. Bring the vinegar, water, sugar, and salt to a simmer on the stove. Stir until the sugar and salt have dissolved. Pour the hot brine over the vegetables, ensuring that the liquids completely cover. Save any extra brine not used for vinaigrettes. Once the jar cools you can screw the cap on and store in the refrigerator for several weeks to two months.