Corned Goose Breast

Corned Goose Breast

  • Course

    Main

  • Serves

    6-8
Chef’s notes

Corned goose breast is one of those recipes that you make when you and your buddies are fortunate enough to pile up a couple bag limits of geese.

I gut and pluck my geese, saving the skin and fat in order to render it for making goose leg confit. The boneless and skinless goose breasts are perfect for corning. The corning process makes them rich and flavorful; it’s a very close approximation to traditional corned beef made from brisket. Even if it’s not St. Patty’s Day, I still pretend that it is and cook this dish with cabbage, carrots, and potatoes. This recipe is fail-safe and extremely easy.

Ingredients

  • 2 boneless, skinless goose breasts, about three to four pounds of meat
  • 2 lbs. small white potatoes, scrubbed and halved or quartered (if very small, leave whole)
  • 1 small green cabbage, outer leaves discarded, cut into 12 wedges
  • 2 medium onions, peeled and halved
  • 2 quarts water
  • 2 cups Morton’s Tender Quick
  • 1 cup brown sugar
  • 2 tbsp. pickling spice (available in most grocery stores)
  • 1 head garlic, cut in half horizontally
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1 bag ( 10 ounces) baby carrots
  • 1 package (10 ounces) frozen pearl onions
  • Grainy or spicy mustard

Preparation

  1. To make the brine, combine 2 quarts water with the Tender Quick, brown sugar, and pickling spice in a large nonreactive cooking pot or food-safe tub.
  2. Bring to a boil to dissolve the Tender Quick and brown sugar, then cool. Add the meat, making sure it is completely covered by the brine. (You can also place the meat in a large resealable plastic bag, pour the cooled brine over it, and seal the bag; this requires less brine to get full coverage.)
  3. Cover and refrigerate for at least 4 days and up to 7 days.
  4. When you’re ready to cook, preheat the oven to 325°.
  5. Remove the meat from the brine.
  6. Put the meat in a large stockpot with the onions and garlic and add water to cover.
  7. Bring to a boil, lower heat to a simmer, and skim off and discard any scum.
  8. Add the bay leaves, cover the pot, and put the pot into the oven.
  9. Cook until the meat is fork tender, which could be anywhere from 3 to 5 hours.
  10. When the meat is close to ready, add the potatoes, cabbage, carrots, and pearl onions. Cook until the meat and the vegetables are tender.
  11. Using tongs, remove the meat and vegetables and place on a large platter. Break up the meat with the tongs or a meat fork.
  12. Serve with mustard.
Chef’s notes

Corned goose breast is one of those recipes that you make when you and your buddies are fortunate enough to pile up a couple bag limits of geese.

I gut and pluck my geese, saving the skin and fat in order to render it for making goose leg confit. The boneless and skinless goose breasts are perfect for corning. The corning process makes them rich and flavorful; it’s a very close approximation to traditional corned beef made from brisket. Even if it’s not St. Patty’s Day, I still pretend that it is and cook this dish with cabbage, carrots, and potatoes. This recipe is fail-safe and extremely easy.

Ingredients

  • 2 boneless, skinless goose breasts, about three to four pounds of meat
  • 2 lbs. small white potatoes, scrubbed and halved or quartered (if very small, leave whole)
  • 1 small green cabbage, outer leaves discarded, cut into 12 wedges
  • 2 medium onions, peeled and halved
  • 2 quarts water
  • 2 cups Morton’s Tender Quick
  • 1 cup brown sugar
  • 2 tbsp. pickling spice (available in most grocery stores)
  • 1 head garlic, cut in half horizontally
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1 bag ( 10 ounces) baby carrots
  • 1 package (10 ounces) frozen pearl onions
  • Grainy or spicy mustard

Preparation

  1. To make the brine, combine 2 quarts water with the Tender Quick, brown sugar, and pickling spice in a large nonreactive cooking pot or food-safe tub.
  2. Bring to a boil to dissolve the Tender Quick and brown sugar, then cool. Add the meat, making sure it is completely covered by the brine. (You can also place the meat in a large resealable plastic bag, pour the cooled brine over it, and seal the bag; this requires less brine to get full coverage.)
  3. Cover and refrigerate for at least 4 days and up to 7 days.
  4. When you’re ready to cook, preheat the oven to 325°.
  5. Remove the meat from the brine.
  6. Put the meat in a large stockpot with the onions and garlic and add water to cover.
  7. Bring to a boil, lower heat to a simmer, and skim off and discard any scum.
  8. Add the bay leaves, cover the pot, and put the pot into the oven.
  9. Cook until the meat is fork tender, which could be anywhere from 3 to 5 hours.
  10. When the meat is close to ready, add the potatoes, cabbage, carrots, and pearl onions. Cook until the meat and the vegetables are tender.
  11. Using tongs, remove the meat and vegetables and place on a large platter. Break up the meat with the tongs or a meat fork.
  12. Serve with mustard.

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Corned Goose Breast

Recipe by: Steven Rinella
Corned Goose Breast
  • Course

    Main

  • Serves

    6-8
Chef’s notes

Corned goose breast is one of those recipes that you make when you and your buddies are fortunate enough to pile up a couple bag limits of geese.

I gut and pluck my geese, saving the skin and fat in order to render it for making goose leg confit. The boneless and skinless goose breasts are perfect for corning. The corning process makes them rich and flavorful; it’s a very close approximation to traditional corned beef made from brisket. Even if it’s not St. Patty’s Day, I still pretend that it is and cook this dish with cabbage, carrots, and potatoes. This recipe is fail-safe and extremely easy.

Ingredients

  • 2 boneless, skinless goose breasts, about three to four pounds of meat
  • 2 lbs. small white potatoes, scrubbed and halved or quartered (if very small, leave whole)
  • 1 small green cabbage, outer leaves discarded, cut into 12 wedges
  • 2 medium onions, peeled and halved
  • 2 quarts water
  • 2 cups Morton’s Tender Quick
  • 1 cup brown sugar
  • 2 tbsp. pickling spice (available in most grocery stores)
  • 1 head garlic, cut in half horizontally
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1 bag ( 10 ounces) baby carrots
  • 1 package (10 ounces) frozen pearl onions
  • Grainy or spicy mustard

Preparation

  1. To make the brine, combine 2 quarts water with the Tender Quick, brown sugar, and pickling spice in a large nonreactive cooking pot or food-safe tub.
  2. Bring to a boil to dissolve the Tender Quick and brown sugar, then cool. Add the meat, making sure it is completely covered by the brine. (You can also place the meat in a large resealable plastic bag, pour the cooled brine over it, and seal the bag; this requires less brine to get full coverage.)
  3. Cover and refrigerate for at least 4 days and up to 7 days.
  4. When you’re ready to cook, preheat the oven to 325°.
  5. Remove the meat from the brine.
  6. Put the meat in a large stockpot with the onions and garlic and add water to cover.
  7. Bring to a boil, lower heat to a simmer, and skim off and discard any scum.
  8. Add the bay leaves, cover the pot, and put the pot into the oven.
  9. Cook until the meat is fork tender, which could be anywhere from 3 to 5 hours.
  10. When the meat is close to ready, add the potatoes, cabbage, carrots, and pearl onions. Cook until the meat and the vegetables are tender.
  11. Using tongs, remove the meat and vegetables and place on a large platter. Break up the meat with the tongs or a meat fork.
  12. Serve with mustard.