Grilled Flank Steak with Verde Sauce

Grilled Flank Steak with Verde Sauce

  • Prep time

    30 minutes

  • Cook time

    15 minutes

  • Course

    Main

  • Skill level

    Beginner

  • Season

    Summer, Spring

  • Serves

    4 to 6
Chef’s notes

In the Sourced episode “Restoring the Cycles of Nature,” I visit Will Harris at White Oak Pastures, a regenerative farm in Georgia. This was my first time sourcing and cooking with beef in several years since I primarily rely on wild food for my protein.

What I’ve learned through hunting and processing my own meat, is that we don’t get to choose which cuts we want—we have to utilize the whole animal. Likewise, farmers selling direct-to-consumer need to sell the entire cow. When asked what cuts he wishes people ate more of, Will Harris said flank and skirt.

These thin muscles have a long grainline and are best when seared over high heat for a short amount of time, similar to the way you would treat a venison steak. Most people marinate flank steak, but it actually does little to tenderize the meat. For flavor, I prefer to add this vibrant green Italian Verde sauce just before serving.

Ingredients

  • 2 lbs. beef flank or skirt steak, trimmed
  • Coarse sea salt and cracked pepper
  • High smoke point oil for grilling, such as grapeseed, avocado, or canola

Italian Salsa Verde

  • Juice of half a lemon
  • 3 tbsp. extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 tbsp. capers
  • 1 garlic clove, minced
  • 2 anchovies, finely chopped (optional)
  • 1 cup packed fresh parsley leaves

Also works with

Venison

Special equipment

Grill

Preparation

  1. Remove the meat from the refrigerator at least 30 minutes and up to an hour before cooking. Meanwhile, prepare a wood or charcoal fire and burn down to white hot coals. If using a propane grill, turn the heat to high, about 450 to 550°F.
  2. While the coals are getting hot, make the salsa verde by combining the lemon juice, olive oil, capers, garlic, anchovies, and a pinch of salt in a medium-sized bowl. Use a whisk and start to emulsify the liquids into a vinaigrette. Then, finely chop the parsley leaves and whisk into the vinaigrette until emulsified. You can also use a mini food processor and pulse all the ingredients together for a smoother sauce, but I like the textural consistency of the sauce when made by hand.
  3. Just before grilling, pat the meat very dry with paper towels, season both sides with salt and pepper, and give it a thin coat of oil.
  4. Lay the steaks down, you should hear a sizzle, and cook for about 2 minutes on the first side, flip, then cook another 2 minutes on the second side. Flip again so it's on its first side, and grill for only a minute, then flip one last time (cooking both sides of the meat twice) and cook for one more minute. It should be done at this point. Use tongs to check for doneness, as you would your hand. Aim for the texture when you press your thumb and middle finger together, which is medium-rare, or about 130°F internal temperature.
  5. Transfer the meat to a cutting board and allow it to rest for 5 to 8 minutes. Make thin slices at a 45° angle against the grain to allow for wider, thinner pieces of meat. Spoon the salsa verde across the tops and serve immediately.
Chef’s notes

In the Sourced episode “Restoring the Cycles of Nature,” I visit Will Harris at White Oak Pastures, a regenerative farm in Georgia. This was my first time sourcing and cooking with beef in several years since I primarily rely on wild food for my protein.

What I’ve learned through hunting and processing my own meat, is that we don’t get to choose which cuts we want—we have to utilize the whole animal. Likewise, farmers selling direct-to-consumer need to sell the entire cow. When asked what cuts he wishes people ate more of, Will Harris said flank and skirt.

These thin muscles have a long grainline and are best when seared over high heat for a short amount of time, similar to the way you would treat a venison steak. Most people marinate flank steak, but it actually does little to tenderize the meat. For flavor, I prefer to add this vibrant green Italian Verde sauce just before serving.

Ingredients

  • 2 lbs. beef flank or skirt steak, trimmed
  • Coarse sea salt and cracked pepper
  • High smoke point oil for grilling, such as grapeseed, avocado, or canola

Italian Salsa Verde

  • Juice of half a lemon
  • 3 tbsp. extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 tbsp. capers
  • 1 garlic clove, minced
  • 2 anchovies, finely chopped (optional)
  • 1 cup packed fresh parsley leaves

Also works with

Venison

Special equipment

Grill

Preparation

  1. Remove the meat from the refrigerator at least 30 minutes and up to an hour before cooking. Meanwhile, prepare a wood or charcoal fire and burn down to white hot coals. If using a propane grill, turn the heat to high, about 450 to 550°F.
  2. While the coals are getting hot, make the salsa verde by combining the lemon juice, olive oil, capers, garlic, anchovies, and a pinch of salt in a medium-sized bowl. Use a whisk and start to emulsify the liquids into a vinaigrette. Then, finely chop the parsley leaves and whisk into the vinaigrette until emulsified. You can also use a mini food processor and pulse all the ingredients together for a smoother sauce, but I like the textural consistency of the sauce when made by hand.
  3. Just before grilling, pat the meat very dry with paper towels, season both sides with salt and pepper, and give it a thin coat of oil.
  4. Lay the steaks down, you should hear a sizzle, and cook for about 2 minutes on the first side, flip, then cook another 2 minutes on the second side. Flip again so it's on its first side, and grill for only a minute, then flip one last time (cooking both sides of the meat twice) and cook for one more minute. It should be done at this point. Use tongs to check for doneness, as you would your hand. Aim for the texture when you press your thumb and middle finger together, which is medium-rare, or about 130°F internal temperature.
  5. Transfer the meat to a cutting board and allow it to rest for 5 to 8 minutes. Make thin slices at a 45° angle against the grain to allow for wider, thinner pieces of meat. Spoon the salsa verde across the tops and serve immediately.

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Grilled Flank Steak with Verde Sauce

Recipe by: Danielle Prewett
Grilled Flank Steak with Verde Sauce
  • Prep time

    30 minutes

  • Cook time

    15 minutes

  • Course

    Main

  • Skill level

    Beginner

  • Season

    Summer, Spring

  • Serves

    4 to 6
Chef’s notes

In the Sourced episode “Restoring the Cycles of Nature,” I visit Will Harris at White Oak Pastures, a regenerative farm in Georgia. This was my first time sourcing and cooking with beef in several years since I primarily rely on wild food for my protein.

What I’ve learned through hunting and processing my own meat, is that we don’t get to choose which cuts we want—we have to utilize the whole animal. Likewise, farmers selling direct-to-consumer need to sell the entire cow. When asked what cuts he wishes people ate more of, Will Harris said flank and skirt.

These thin muscles have a long grainline and are best when seared over high heat for a short amount of time, similar to the way you would treat a venison steak. Most people marinate flank steak, but it actually does little to tenderize the meat. For flavor, I prefer to add this vibrant green Italian Verde sauce just before serving.

Ingredients

  • 2 lbs. beef flank or skirt steak, trimmed
  • Coarse sea salt and cracked pepper
  • High smoke point oil for grilling, such as grapeseed, avocado, or canola

Italian Salsa Verde

  • Juice of half a lemon
  • 3 tbsp. extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 tbsp. capers
  • 1 garlic clove, minced
  • 2 anchovies, finely chopped (optional)
  • 1 cup packed fresh parsley leaves

Also works with

Venison

Special equipment

Grill

Preparation

  1. Remove the meat from the refrigerator at least 30 minutes and up to an hour before cooking. Meanwhile, prepare a wood or charcoal fire and burn down to white hot coals. If using a propane grill, turn the heat to high, about 450 to 550°F.
  2. While the coals are getting hot, make the salsa verde by combining the lemon juice, olive oil, capers, garlic, anchovies, and a pinch of salt in a medium-sized bowl. Use a whisk and start to emulsify the liquids into a vinaigrette. Then, finely chop the parsley leaves and whisk into the vinaigrette until emulsified. You can also use a mini food processor and pulse all the ingredients together for a smoother sauce, but I like the textural consistency of the sauce when made by hand.
  3. Just before grilling, pat the meat very dry with paper towels, season both sides with salt and pepper, and give it a thin coat of oil.
  4. Lay the steaks down, you should hear a sizzle, and cook for about 2 minutes on the first side, flip, then cook another 2 minutes on the second side. Flip again so it's on its first side, and grill for only a minute, then flip one last time (cooking both sides of the meat twice) and cook for one more minute. It should be done at this point. Use tongs to check for doneness, as you would your hand. Aim for the texture when you press your thumb and middle finger together, which is medium-rare, or about 130°F internal temperature.
  5. Transfer the meat to a cutting board and allow it to rest for 5 to 8 minutes. Make thin slices at a 45° angle against the grain to allow for wider, thinner pieces of meat. Spoon the salsa verde across the tops and serve immediately.