Bear Fat Chocolate Croissants

Bear Fat Chocolate Croissants

  • Duration

    1 hour

  • Serves

    6 croissants
Chef’s notes

Black bear grease is as versatile as it gets. Meat, hide, skull, and claws are nice, but it’s that beautiful liquid gold I get most excited about.

Rendered bear fat is stable, mild, and useful—akin to typical shortening. It can be used in the same manner. I like it for biscuits, cookies, pie crusts, fried food, and of course, pastries. The mild, bear fat flavor also makes it a perfect candidate for chocolate croissants.

Ingredients

  • 2 3/4 cup bread flour
  • 1 cup water
  • 1 tbsp. dry yeast
  • 1 tbsp. white sugar
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • 1/2 cup rendered bear fat (or butter), kept cold
  • 2 full-sized dark chocolate bars
  • 1 egg yolk
  • 1/4 cup water for egg wash

Also works with

Pork lard, butter

Special equipment

Rolling pin

Preparation

  1. In a stand mixer, add warm water, white sugar, and yeast. Let sit until foamy.
  2. Add flour and salt and mix until dough pulls from the walls of the bowl. Cover and place in fridge overnight.
  3. Pull chilled dough onto a floured surface and roll to make an 8×16-inch rectangle. Spread fat on the center of the dough and then fold the outside of the dough in.
  4. Roll the folded dough to the same 8×16-inch shape, then fold it again. Place in fridge for 1 hour. Be sure to keep the fat cold and in a distinct layer. This is key to proper lamination. Repeat this process two more times, being sure to refrigerate after each fold.
  5. Roll out the dough a final time to about 1/4-inch thick. Cut into rectangles about that are about 3×6-inch. Place two to three chocolate squares in each rectangle and roll them up. Place the pastries on a non-stick cookie sheet, cover with plastic wrap, and allow to proof for approximately 1 hour.
  6. Brush with egg wash and place in a 425-degree oven for 18 minutes, or until golden brown.
Chef’s notes

Black bear grease is as versatile as it gets. Meat, hide, skull, and claws are nice, but it’s that beautiful liquid gold I get most excited about.

Rendered bear fat is stable, mild, and useful—akin to typical shortening. It can be used in the same manner. I like it for biscuits, cookies, pie crusts, fried food, and of course, pastries. The mild, bear fat flavor also makes it a perfect candidate for chocolate croissants.

Ingredients

  • 2 3/4 cup bread flour
  • 1 cup water
  • 1 tbsp. dry yeast
  • 1 tbsp. white sugar
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • 1/2 cup rendered bear fat (or butter), kept cold
  • 2 full-sized dark chocolate bars
  • 1 egg yolk
  • 1/4 cup water for egg wash

Also works with

Pork lard, butter

Special equipment

Rolling pin

Preparation

  1. In a stand mixer, add warm water, white sugar, and yeast. Let sit until foamy.
  2. Add flour and salt and mix until dough pulls from the walls of the bowl. Cover and place in fridge overnight.
  3. Pull chilled dough onto a floured surface and roll to make an 8×16-inch rectangle. Spread fat on the center of the dough and then fold the outside of the dough in.
  4. Roll the folded dough to the same 8×16-inch shape, then fold it again. Place in fridge for 1 hour. Be sure to keep the fat cold and in a distinct layer. This is key to proper lamination. Repeat this process two more times, being sure to refrigerate after each fold.
  5. Roll out the dough a final time to about 1/4-inch thick. Cut into rectangles about that are about 3×6-inch. Place two to three chocolate squares in each rectangle and roll them up. Place the pastries on a non-stick cookie sheet, cover with plastic wrap, and allow to proof for approximately 1 hour.
  6. Brush with egg wash and place in a 425-degree oven for 18 minutes, or until golden brown.
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Bear Fat Chocolate Croissants

Recipe by: Michael Vialpando
Bear Fat Chocolate Croissants
  • Duration

    1 hour

  • Serves

    6 croissants
Chef’s notes

Black bear grease is as versatile as it gets. Meat, hide, skull, and claws are nice, but it’s that beautiful liquid gold I get most excited about.

Rendered bear fat is stable, mild, and useful—akin to typical shortening. It can be used in the same manner. I like it for biscuits, cookies, pie crusts, fried food, and of course, pastries. The mild, bear fat flavor also makes it a perfect candidate for chocolate croissants.

Ingredients

  • 2 3/4 cup bread flour
  • 1 cup water
  • 1 tbsp. dry yeast
  • 1 tbsp. white sugar
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • 1/2 cup rendered bear fat (or butter), kept cold
  • 2 full-sized dark chocolate bars
  • 1 egg yolk
  • 1/4 cup water for egg wash

Also works with

Pork lard, butter

Special equipment

Rolling pin

Preparation

  1. In a stand mixer, add warm water, white sugar, and yeast. Let sit until foamy.
  2. Add flour and salt and mix until dough pulls from the walls of the bowl. Cover and place in fridge overnight.
  3. Pull chilled dough onto a floured surface and roll to make an 8×16-inch rectangle. Spread fat on the center of the dough and then fold the outside of the dough in.
  4. Roll the folded dough to the same 8×16-inch shape, then fold it again. Place in fridge for 1 hour. Be sure to keep the fat cold and in a distinct layer. This is key to proper lamination. Repeat this process two more times, being sure to refrigerate after each fold.
  5. Roll out the dough a final time to about 1/4-inch thick. Cut into rectangles about that are about 3×6-inch. Place two to three chocolate squares in each rectangle and roll them up. Place the pastries on a non-stick cookie sheet, cover with plastic wrap, and allow to proof for approximately 1 hour.
  6. Brush with egg wash and place in a 425-degree oven for 18 minutes, or until golden brown.