Tex-Mex Ceviche

Tex-Mex Ceviche

  • Course

    Small Bites

  • Duration

    4 hours

  • Serves

    4+ as Appetizer
Chef’s notes

Is there a better way to serve fresh fish on a hot day than in a refreshing bowl of ceviche? As a wild fish enthusiast and native Texan, I’d say no.

Ceviche is a traditional Central and South American dish. What sets ceviche apart is that the fish gets “cooked” with citric acid and enzymes instead of heat, but you’re still eating it raw. It’s best served cold and it makes a delicious appetizer or a light main course.

There are as many variations on ceviche as there are regions that claim this as a local dish. My version is what I grew up eating, as a Texan influenced by Mexican cuisine. It is a relatively simple blend of limes, oranges, tomatoes, red onion, jalapeño, and avocado. In other words, it’s a souped-up version of pico de gallo.

Most recipes call for mild flavored, firm fish or shellfish, however, I find that a variety of saltwater fish works. You can use whatever is available, but I’d stress that it needs to be fresh and clean.

Firm fish flesh yields a meaty texture that won’t fall apart when mixed. Flaky fish can also work, so long as it isn’t cut up too small and it’s handled with care. When fish soaks in acidic fruit juices, a reaction called denaturation takes place that transforms the soft flesh to a firm, cooked texture. The leftover juice from the marinade is referred to as tiger milk. It’s commonly used to make cocktails as a hangover cure, known as “hair of the tiger.”

I make ceviche with speckled trout and redfish. These are relatively thin and flaky fish, but I would be cautious making ceviche with anything more delicate.

Serve ceviche as an appetizer with tortilla chips, on a tostada, or inside lettuce cups with roasted plantains or grilled corn.

Ingredients

  • 1 lb. fresh, salt water fish filets
  • 3/4 cup fresh lime juice, plus extra if needed
  • 3/4 cup fresh orange juice, plus extra if needed
  • 2-3 Roma tomatoes
  • 1/4 red onion, finely diced
  • 1 jalapeño (with or without seeds), minced
  • 1/4 cup loosely packed cilantro leaves, chopped
  • 1 avocado, chopped
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Preparation

  1. Cut the fish into 1/4” to 1/2” pieces. Place the cubed fish in a large, non-reactive bowl. Add the fresh orange and lime juice. It should be enough to cover the fish. If not, squeeze more limes and oranges. Cover tightly with plastic wrap and refrigerate.
  2. Different fish cook at different rates. I find softer, flakier fish take less time, while firm, dense fish take a little longer. Also, the bigger the pieces, the longer it will take. Generally, 4 hours is more than enough time. Test by taking a piece and splitting it open. It should be firm and opaque all the way through.
  3. While the fish marinates, prepare the remaining ingredients. Cut the Roma tomatoes into quarters and de-seed. Chop into small pieces and set inside a large bowl. Add the onion, jalapeño, cilantro and avocado. Season with a pinch of salt and pepper, then mix. Set inside the fridge to chill until the fish is ready.
  4. Pour the fish into a colander and drain the juices. Stir the fish into the bowl of pico and serve immediately.
Chef’s notes

Is there a better way to serve fresh fish on a hot day than in a refreshing bowl of ceviche? As a wild fish enthusiast and native Texan, I’d say no.

Ceviche is a traditional Central and South American dish. What sets ceviche apart is that the fish gets “cooked” with citric acid and enzymes instead of heat, but you’re still eating it raw. It’s best served cold and it makes a delicious appetizer or a light main course.

There are as many variations on ceviche as there are regions that claim this as a local dish. My version is what I grew up eating, as a Texan influenced by Mexican cuisine. It is a relatively simple blend of limes, oranges, tomatoes, red onion, jalapeño, and avocado. In other words, it’s a souped-up version of pico de gallo.

Most recipes call for mild flavored, firm fish or shellfish, however, I find that a variety of saltwater fish works. You can use whatever is available, but I’d stress that it needs to be fresh and clean.

Firm fish flesh yields a meaty texture that won’t fall apart when mixed. Flaky fish can also work, so long as it isn’t cut up too small and it’s handled with care. When fish soaks in acidic fruit juices, a reaction called denaturation takes place that transforms the soft flesh to a firm, cooked texture. The leftover juice from the marinade is referred to as tiger milk. It’s commonly used to make cocktails as a hangover cure, known as “hair of the tiger.”

I make ceviche with speckled trout and redfish. These are relatively thin and flaky fish, but I would be cautious making ceviche with anything more delicate.

Serve ceviche as an appetizer with tortilla chips, on a tostada, or inside lettuce cups with roasted plantains or grilled corn.

Ingredients

  • 1 lb. fresh, salt water fish filets
  • 3/4 cup fresh lime juice, plus extra if needed
  • 3/4 cup fresh orange juice, plus extra if needed
  • 2-3 Roma tomatoes
  • 1/4 red onion, finely diced
  • 1 jalapeño (with or without seeds), minced
  • 1/4 cup loosely packed cilantro leaves, chopped
  • 1 avocado, chopped
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Preparation

  1. Cut the fish into 1/4” to 1/2” pieces. Place the cubed fish in a large, non-reactive bowl. Add the fresh orange and lime juice. It should be enough to cover the fish. If not, squeeze more limes and oranges. Cover tightly with plastic wrap and refrigerate.
  2. Different fish cook at different rates. I find softer, flakier fish take less time, while firm, dense fish take a little longer. Also, the bigger the pieces, the longer it will take. Generally, 4 hours is more than enough time. Test by taking a piece and splitting it open. It should be firm and opaque all the way through.
  3. While the fish marinates, prepare the remaining ingredients. Cut the Roma tomatoes into quarters and de-seed. Chop into small pieces and set inside a large bowl. Add the onion, jalapeño, cilantro and avocado. Season with a pinch of salt and pepper, then mix. Set inside the fridge to chill until the fish is ready.
  4. Pour the fish into a colander and drain the juices. Stir the fish into the bowl of pico and serve immediately.
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Save this recipe

Tex-Mex Ceviche

Recipe by: Danielle Prewett
Tex-Mex Ceviche
  • Course

    Small Bites

  • Duration

    4 hours

  • Serves

    4+ as Appetizer
Chef’s notes

Is there a better way to serve fresh fish on a hot day than in a refreshing bowl of ceviche? As a wild fish enthusiast and native Texan, I’d say no.

Ceviche is a traditional Central and South American dish. What sets ceviche apart is that the fish gets “cooked” with citric acid and enzymes instead of heat, but you’re still eating it raw. It’s best served cold and it makes a delicious appetizer or a light main course.

There are as many variations on ceviche as there are regions that claim this as a local dish. My version is what I grew up eating, as a Texan influenced by Mexican cuisine. It is a relatively simple blend of limes, oranges, tomatoes, red onion, jalapeño, and avocado. In other words, it’s a souped-up version of pico de gallo.

Most recipes call for mild flavored, firm fish or shellfish, however, I find that a variety of saltwater fish works. You can use whatever is available, but I’d stress that it needs to be fresh and clean.

Firm fish flesh yields a meaty texture that won’t fall apart when mixed. Flaky fish can also work, so long as it isn’t cut up too small and it’s handled with care. When fish soaks in acidic fruit juices, a reaction called denaturation takes place that transforms the soft flesh to a firm, cooked texture. The leftover juice from the marinade is referred to as tiger milk. It’s commonly used to make cocktails as a hangover cure, known as “hair of the tiger.”

I make ceviche with speckled trout and redfish. These are relatively thin and flaky fish, but I would be cautious making ceviche with anything more delicate.

Serve ceviche as an appetizer with tortilla chips, on a tostada, or inside lettuce cups with roasted plantains or grilled corn.

Ingredients

  • 1 lb. fresh, salt water fish filets
  • 3/4 cup fresh lime juice, plus extra if needed
  • 3/4 cup fresh orange juice, plus extra if needed
  • 2-3 Roma tomatoes
  • 1/4 red onion, finely diced
  • 1 jalapeño (with or without seeds), minced
  • 1/4 cup loosely packed cilantro leaves, chopped
  • 1 avocado, chopped
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Preparation

  1. Cut the fish into 1/4” to 1/2” pieces. Place the cubed fish in a large, non-reactive bowl. Add the fresh orange and lime juice. It should be enough to cover the fish. If not, squeeze more limes and oranges. Cover tightly with plastic wrap and refrigerate.
  2. Different fish cook at different rates. I find softer, flakier fish take less time, while firm, dense fish take a little longer. Also, the bigger the pieces, the longer it will take. Generally, 4 hours is more than enough time. Test by taking a piece and splitting it open. It should be firm and opaque all the way through.
  3. While the fish marinates, prepare the remaining ingredients. Cut the Roma tomatoes into quarters and de-seed. Chop into small pieces and set inside a large bowl. Add the onion, jalapeño, cilantro and avocado. Season with a pinch of salt and pepper, then mix. Set inside the fridge to chill until the fish is ready.
  4. Pour the fish into a colander and drain the juices. Stir the fish into the bowl of pico and serve immediately.