Anthropology

First-Time Hunter Finds Corpse in California Desert

Anthropology

First-Time Hunter Finds Corpse in California Desert

Kyle Gibson sat shaken and sweating in the air-conditioned patrol car’s back seat, silently hoping the two Southern California sheriff’s deputies wouldn’t arrest him. Gibson, 36, knew his fears were irrational. He’d done nothing wrong and everything right since arriving an hour before at the Bureau...
Patrick Durkin Dec 7, 2022
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Forrest Fenn’s Treasure is For Sale

Anthropology

Forrest Fenn’s Treasure is For Sale

The greatest treasure hunt in modern history ended two years ago, but the pursuit isn’t over if you’re willing to pay. Earlier this week, Heritage Auctions announced that 476 items from the famed Forrest Fenn treasure are up for sale. Heritage Auctions acquired the treasure from Tosuro Sagrado...
Spencer Neuharth Nov 18, 2022
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The Greatest Moose Hunt that Never Was

Anthropology

The Greatest Moose Hunt that Never Was

When pondering whether to post vintage hunting photos on the internet, heed this advice: Don’t make claims about the time, place, hunters, and quarry unless your family’s photo albums hold the originals. Even then, skip all such details unless you can vouch for Great-Grandpa’s memory and integrity...
Patrick Durkin Oct 7, 2022
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Photos: Archeologists Discover 31,000-Year-Old Amputee

Anthropology

Photos: Archeologists Discover 31,000-Year-Old Amputee

In a recent study published in Nature, scientists revealed evidence of the oldest known surgery performed by humans. A team of archaeologists based out of Griffith University, Australia, discovered 31,000-year-old skeletal remains with the left foot surgically removed above the ankle at the fibula...
Maggie Hudlow Sep 16, 2022
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Photos: 1,500-Year-Old Arrow Discovered in Glacier

Anthropology

Photos: 1,500-Year-Old Arrow Discovered in Glacier

Archaeologists scouring melting glaciers recently discovered an arrow that predates the Vikings. The arrow, estimated to be around 1,500 years old based on the shape of the arrowhead and nock, was uncovered by researchers from Secrets Of The Ice, a glacier archaeology program. Secrets of the Ice is...
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Photos: 10,000-Year-Old Human Footprints Discovered in Utah

Anthropology

Photos: 10,000-Year-Old Human Footprints Discovered in Utah

Archaeologists in Utah recently stumbled upon a rare find: early human footprints dating back at least 10,000 years. The footprints, which were discovered in the salt flats of the Air Force’s Utah Testing and Training Range, are believed to have been created by humans walking along the muddy...
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The Mystery of America's Stonehenge

Anthropology

The Mystery of America's Stonehenge

If you’re driving through the rocky ridges of southeastern New Hampshire and see a sign for “America’s Stonehenge,” don’t expect a peek into North America’s hitherto-unknown megalithic past. America’s Stonehenge is more a modern nickname for an intriguing New England sightseeing attraction than the...
Patrick Durkin Aug 1, 2022
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A New Study Will Change the Way We View Human Evolution

Anthropology

A New Study Will Change the Way We View Human Evolution

A new study out of South Africa could rewrite certain aspects of humankind’s evolutionary origin story. The study hinges on an innovative fossil aging technique called cosmogenic nuclide dating. It shows that the fossil record of an early human-like hominid called Australopithecus africanus...
Travis Hall Jul 12, 2022
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Baby Mammoth is 'Most Complete' Ever Found in North America

Anthropology

Baby Mammoth is 'Most Complete' Ever Found in North America

A wooly mammoth calf discovered earlier this month in Canada’s Yukon Territory is the first near-complete and best-preserved mummified mammoth remains ever found in North America. The calf, dubbed “Nun cho ga,” was found with skin and hair still attached after being frozen in permafrost over 30,00...
Jordan Sillars Jun 29, 2022
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Video: Explorers Find One of History's Most Famous Shipwrecks

Anthropology

Video: Explorers Find One of History's Most Famous Shipwrecks

In August 1914, five days after the outbreak of World War I, Irish-born Ernest Shackleton sent forth his ship Endurance from southern England with the goal of leading the first crew to traverse the Antarctic continent across the South Pole. Norwegian Roald Amundsen had beat him to the pole, but this...
Sam Lungren Mar 10, 2022
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The Post-Kill Traditions of North American Hunters

Anthropology

The Post-Kill Traditions of North American Hunters

Tomorrow’s anthropologists will have files an inch deep and a mile wide when they try cataloging and explaining the traditions and post-kill rituals of today’s North American hunters. That’s to be expected, given that Canada, the United States, and our hunting traditions are relatively young and...
Patrick Durkin Jan 12, 2022
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