People

Jordan Sillars

Jordan Sillars

Jordan Sillars is a supporting editor at MeatEater who writes about firearms, conservation, and American literature. He hails from the East Texas piney woods, where he likes pursuing squirrels, whitetail, wild hogs, and sand bass (but mostly squirrels).

Recent Posts

Video: Male Brown Bear Falls to Death After Attacking Sow

Wildlife Management

Video: Male Brown Bear Falls to Death After Attacking Sow

Recently released footage from the northern Castilla y Leon region of Spain shows a male brown bear brutally attacking a female with a cub. The pair fight for approximately two minutes before falling down a sheer cliff. The female reportedly survived the encounter and is being sought by local...
Wild Animal Kills Flamingo Flock at Famous American Zoo

Wildlife Management

Wild Animal Kills Flamingo Flock at Famous American Zoo

Twenty-five American flamingos and one Northern pintail duck were killed at the Smithsonian National Zoo this week in what appears to be a lone-fox attack. Three additional flamingos were injured and are receiving treatment at the Zoo’s veterinary hospital, officials announced in a press release...
California Considers Dropping 3,000 Pounds of Poison on Infested Islands

Wildlife Management

California Considers Dropping 3,000 Pounds of Poison on Infested Islands

The South Farallon Islands off the coast of San Francisco are best known as a haven for migratory seabirds, a breeding ground for seals, and, of course, a staple filming location for Discovery Channel’s “Shark Week.” But the small chain of islands has been in the news most recently for another, much...
America’s War On Feral Cats

Wildlife Management

America’s War On Feral Cats

Scott Farver doesn’t have anything against cats. When he found a box of abandoned kittens on his north Texas property a few years ago, he nursed them back to health and took them to a local no-kill shelter. But he also understands the dangers that adult free-roaming cats pose to native wildlife...
The Blueprint for Banning Beaver Trapping

Wildlife Management

The Blueprint for Banning Beaver Trapping

You probably didn’t hear about Oregon House Bills 2843 and 2844. The companion pieces of legislation didn’t receive much national media attention, and they weren’t advanced in committee this year. But the bills would have all but banned beaver trapping in Oregon, and we’ve been told they’ll be back...
Will Jaguars be Reintroduced in the US?

Wildlife Management

Will Jaguars be Reintroduced in the US?

Large predator conservation is going well in the Lower 48. Wolf packs are thriving in Yellowstone and grizzly bear numbers have expanded considerably since they were listed as endangered in 1975. For some folks this is great news; for others, not so much. But one group of scientists believes there’s...
Did Wolves Really Start a Trophic Cascade in Yellowstone?

Wildlife Management

Did Wolves Really Start a Trophic Cascade in Yellowstone?

You’ve seen the video. Narrated by British environmental activist George Monbiot, “How Wolves Change Rivers” tells the incredible story of how gray wolves sparked a cascading series of ecological benefits for the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. “We all know that wolves kill various species of animals...
Study Shows Mountain Lions Have Unexpected Predator

Wildlife Management

Study Shows Mountain Lions Have Unexpected Predator

Elk hunters were among the first in line to object to wolf reintroduction in the Lower 48, but a new study suggests that mountain lion hunters may have had even greater cause for concern. “The big take home of this paper is that wolves have the strongest effect on the survival and abundance of...
Wolf Lieutenants Have the Most Badass Job Ever

Wildlife Management

Wolf Lieutenants Have the Most Badass Job Ever

If the lieutenant de Louveterie sounds like something from medieval literature, there’s good reason. The order of French wolf hunters was commissioned by the emperor Charlemagne (yes, the Charlemagne) in the year 813 AD. Today, Wolf Lieutenants still work in France to surveille animal populations...
How North America’s Most Popular Fish Nearly Went Extinct

Wildlife Management

How North America’s Most Popular Fish Nearly Went Extinct

Cast a line into any lake, river, or ornamental pond in the Lower 48 and you’re likely to pull out a black bass. The black bass genus Micropterus, the most famous of which are the largemouth and smallmouth, are native only to North America and have been the continent’s most popular game fish for at...